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Where’d You Get Your Information From, Huh?

Back in April, I published a post detailing how I was using Google Tasks as part of my experiment to manage my work and personal projects. I lamented at the time (April 12, 2018) that there wasn’t a Tasks app. Seventeen days later, Google launched a Tasks app. It’s very simple and very straightforward, and it’s been very helpful.

While I am updating posts, I will mention that after writing that my place of work hadn’t approved Google Calendars, it has since approved Google Calendars. Now I can start begging for Tasks app approval.

Back In Another Shape

I’ve become fond of LinkedIn, mainly because of its newsfeed. A lot of news outlets and companies share updates from their sites, and LinkedIn has made an efforts to get “influencers” to post to their profiles. It’s not perfect (I follow Quartz, but never seem to see articles they post in my feed), but I find it an interesting, if eclectic information source.

Of course, a lot of business news outlets like Fast Company and The Muse often post articles about how to maximize your LinkedIn profile. It’s sort of like how Oscars voters like to give the Best Picture award to movies about Hollywood. Anyway, a lot of the tips are geared towards people who are looking to get hired or are trying to market themselves to their industry. Although I’m not looking for a job or trying to be an “influencer,” I like reading those suggestions to improve both the way I present myself and the way I share information on the site.

I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately because I am about to switch employers for the fourth time since I started my current job. I took the opportunity to change my LinkedIn profile to reflect both my steady job of seven years and nine months and my rotating cast of employers. I kept my job details in the main job description, then left the description fields blank for the contract staff companies. This way I don’t have to copy and paste my job description every time I switch companies. I am also able acknowledge my employers but connect my place of work to my profile, which makes it easier for my colleagues to find me.

To wit: I used the same format for my previous long-term contract position and within an hour, a former colleague of mine at NOAA reached out to connect. It makes a difference.

Let’s Push Things Forward

A few weeks ago I wrote a post about how I set up editorial calendars to manage my projects at work. I hummed along for a couple of weeks, as efficient as a bird building a nest. Then I went on a work trip, which disrupted my nascent routine. Then I got home from my work trip and…

So now I have a bunch of old tasks in a calendar I’m not looking at and a bunch of new ones scattered around my notebook, which is what I was trying to put a stop to when I started the whole exercise.

Deep breath, step back, start again.

In the meantime, I’ve finally given up my work BlackBerry for a work iPhone. I had plans to download all of the Google apps as I restarted my calendar project. Unfortunately, Google Calendar is not approved for use on department-issued iPhones.

Great.

So I’m in the process of moving the whole project over to Apple’s apps. It’s a work in progress right now, but it has given me an opportunity to rethink the process. There were two things that irked me a bit about using Google Tasks and Google Calendar. One, Tasks gave you the option to set due dates for tasks, but didn’t offer any sort of notifications. So a deadline could pass without warning. Even though it is on me to be checking my calendar, it would have been nice to get a heads up as the due date approached.

Two, if you set up multiple lists in Tasks and then checked them on Google Calendar, the tasks for each list only display on calendar when the list is active. So I can see items on my to do list on my calendar, but I can’t see items on my outstanding issues list unless I switched to that task list. It was a bit awkward.

So I will revisit this in a few weeks to see how I am doing. We have a work conference coming up at the end of the month and I want to make sure that I’m still keeping up my practice that week.

Blaze Ahead and Go Home Happy

In my last blog post, I wrote about experimenting with editorial calendars to manage my task lists. I’m not sure if what I’ve set up resembles a traditional editorial calendar, but it has been useful so far.

I’ve always kept to do lists, either on paper or using apps. My problem has been that I never differentiated between tasks, projects, and goals. I would jot down very specific tasks, like “follow-up with my supervisor about our draft guidelines document,” then mixed in broad items, like “redesign website.” My lists were a mess. Here’s what I’ve done so far to tackle the problem.

My office uses G Suite, so I started in Google Calendars with creating calendars for my four main, broad areas of work: applied technology, data management, information resources, and general office tasks. These calendars work with  my default appointments calendar and the Google Tasks calendar to give me a comprehensive, color-coded picture of what I have on my plate.

I like Google Tasks because I can mark emails in my Gmail inbox as tasks, then get them out of my inbox. (I do something similar with Outlook, because I have two work emails.) But there are a couple of drawbacks. There isn’t a Tasks app and the Tasks calendar doesn’t appear in the Google Calendars app. It is very much a desktop application. The workaround on a mobile device is going to https://mail.google.com/tasks/canvas in a browser. Also, unlike in Outlook’s task bar, there is not an option in Google Tasks to set alarms for tasks. I can set a due date, but I have to pay closer attention to my calendar to make sure I don’t miss the deadline.

Anyway, within Google Tasks, I created six task lists: four for my areas of work, then one called To Do List and one called OUTSTANDING ISSUES.

To Do List does what it says on the tin. I try to keep the list concise by recording one-time action items that I need to address, no matter what area of work they fall under.

OUTSTANDING ISSUES shows tasks that are in someone else’s court. It dawned on me when putting this together that I have a habit of marking things off my to do list without determining whether or not I would need to follow up. I had technically completed the task, but I still had more work to do. It’s a bad feeling when I realize I asked someone a question three weeks prior and never got a reply. Now I can keep track of what I need to follow up on.

The task lists for each area of work don’t serve as to do lists, but instead show my duties within those areas. For example, my Applied Technology list shows the main projects that I work on, such as advising on ILS and membership systems, administering tech surveys, and managing our LISTSERVs and Facebook group. I use the notes box in each task to list sub-duties if applicable, such as making sure the folks at LibraryThing and TinyCat still like us.

The notes field is turning into a bit of a bonus for me because I am using it to mark down recurring tasks. I am generally good about keeping tabs on things like running reports on the first of the month, but I have never written them down before. After getting them out of my head and into the notes, I can then add them as recurring appointments within respective area of work calendars. The coloring coding helps me keep track of what’s on tap each day.

That’s fine for now but what comes after? Well, I am sure I will be making adjustments as I go along as I come up with new ideas or better ways of noting things. Also, I need to stay disciplined because I know my history of starting and abandoning productivity systems.

The key thing is I am having a lot of fun working on this (and doing something similar with my home projects). If it’s fun, it won’t feel like a chore, right?

Now Get Busy

My wife and I write a blog about the Eurovision Song Contest called Eurovision Lemurs. We do a lot of writing this time of year as the participating countries select their entries.  We will stay busy until well after the last piece of confetti drops in the middle of May.

After the Song Contest ends, we usually end up going silent until the new season begins. This year, we set a goal to have one new post every two weeks from June through December. We have a few topics we have always wanted to write about, so summer and fall would be perfect times to tackle them if we just were a little more organized. And also didn’t suffer from post-Eurovison depression.

So we’ve set up an editorial calendar using Google Calendar. I’m going to use it for this blog as well, since I really want to make a proper go at it this time.

Even though the writing projects have nothing to do with my job, I also plan to take the editorial calendar mentality to the office. I have a Post-it easel pad in my cube on which I wrote down all of the major projects I have on my plate. It acts as a sort of to-do list, but it occurred to me recently that it is missing actionable deadlines.

I’ve read a bit about time blocking, and I do see the value in scheduling segments of the day to work on projects without distraction. But I never really got into the habit of doing it. Finding another angle to approach it may help. So let’s see if an editorial calendar works. More to come…

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